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Challenge: Healthy Swaps

The Science of Saute

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The science of saute. This means to brown food fast over medium high heat in a shallow pan using a small amount of fat. The root word of saute is "sauter." The word comes from the French word "sauter," which means "to jump."

The Science of Saute

Ingredients

  • Cast-Iron Pans
  • High smoking point oil or clarified butter
  • Your favorite food. Vegetables, Proteins and fish.

Preparation

  1. Prepare food. Chop food into equal bite size pieces. This ensures even cooking.
  2. Preheat pan on medium high for 5 to 10 minutes. This heats cold spots.
  3. Take proteins from refrigerator 1/2 hour before cooking. Cold protein won't sear and it lowers temperature of pan. to hit a hot pan.
  4. Cook with fat in pan. Clarified butter or a high smoking point oil.
  5. Add your food. Don't overcrowd because food won't cook right.
  6. Fold ingredients or shake the pan to make the food jump. This prevents sticking. Remember, never press down on the food.
  7. Cook vegetables al-dente. Five to 7 minutes. Refer to your recipes for cooking times.
  8. Taste food often. Season well. Almost always in the beginning.
  9. Remove food from pan. Let proteins rest.
  10. Remember to always cook with a pan equal to the proportion of food.

Recipe Tags

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The science of saute:

This means to brown food fast over medium high heat in a shallow pan using a small amount of fat.

The root word of saute is "sauter." The word comes from the French word "sauter," which means "to jump." From Latin saltare which is to dance.

Tips: Sauteed onions blend better into soups . Onions do not combine well, especially acid foods unless they are sauteed first.


You can saute many foods. Proteins fish and vegetables. Tomatoes are a delicious saute with Kosher salt as well as fruits. Peaches with Kosher salt.

If a dish calls for dairy such as heavy cream, the onions may curdle the cream if not sauteed first.

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I recommend every kitchen be stocked with cast-Iron pans.


With, love

Mama G


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